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To see the ASAA 2012 Show, click here
To see the 2012 Award Winners, click here

Robert G. Aikins

Hero of Midway
(15.5" x 19.5" Oil)

At the Battle of Midway, the Douglas SBD Dauntless did more than wreck the Japanese fleet. The SBD showed itself to be the most important American dive-bomber ever built. The Dauntless in this painting is as it appeared in 2004 at the "Thunder Over Michigan" Air Show.

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Steve Anderson, ASAA
Rendezvous
(18" x 36" Oil)

WAA flight of W12 seaplanes rendezvous with a big U.81 class U-Boat in the North Sea. Sometimes acting as scouts, the W12 covered a much wider area of visibility than the U-Boat could. The submarine and the airplane were the two most rapidly advancing technologies in the second decade of the 20th Century.

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Gerald Asher, ASAA
Gabby
(24" x 36" Oil)

In the middle of July 1944, 61st Fighter Squadron commander (and leading scorer of the 56th Fighter Group) LTC Francis S. Gabreski bounces an ME-109 for his final victory of the war. Within two weeks he would make himself a prisoner of war when, during a strafing run on an enemy airfield, he got too low and caught his propeller on the ground.

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Giampaolo Baglioni
Afternoon in Oshkosh
(30" x 40" Acrylic)

My first visit to Oshkosh was in July 2004. Monday afternoon was quiet. At the Warbirds area, people were browsing and leisurely watching the planes. The beautiful B-25 Lady Luck was gleaming against the sun with the grass and part of herself reflected in the fuselage.

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Brian Bateman
To Fight Another Day
(28" x 40" Oil)

"To Fight Another Day" is based on the danger that faced the crews flying B-29s over the vast Pacific Ocean to reach targets in Japan and then return to their home base either on Tinian or Saipan. Sometimes through battle damage, aircraft malfunction, or running out of fuel, the crews fought the perils of ditching with the possibility of never being found. This crew was lucky.

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Ardell Bourgeois
Air Show Air Force One
(12" x 7" Oil)

At the 1994 Dayton Air Show this E-4B was being touted as Air Force One whether by mistake or on purpose. It is in fact an emergency communications center, as any 'Nightwatch' crewman will tell you.

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Mark Bray
The Magic of Flight
(24" x 18" Watercolor)

The fascination with flight has been around as long as mankind is old ... "The Magic of Flight" is all about that inherent need to look into the sky and wonder at everything that moves within in it – Just as a child does.

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Paul Burrows
Closure
(18" x 24" Oil)

Daybreak, and this F101 crew is about to conclude a practice intercept at the end of an all-night exercise. This one's easy because - as the saying goes - one eyeball on the target is worth a thousand sweeps of the radar.

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Hank Caruso, ASAA
Encapsulated
(11" x 14" Ink and Prismacolor)

In the early days of the US space program, Project mercury astronauts were restrained in the confining inards of the Mercury space capsule. They could not get out of their seats or perform extravehicular activities (EVAs). Here a Mercury astronaut is carefully installed in his cramped Mercubicle for a launch date.

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Douglas Castleman
SH-60 Seahawk
(12" x 24" Oil)

A SH-60F Seahawk being prepared for flight in San Diego, CA.

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Alex Durr
Cruisin Route 66
(35" x 25" Oil)

A family heading west on Rt 66, in their 1957 Chevy Bel Air are over flown by a flight of F-86 Sabres, from George AFB, California. The artist's eldest daughter posed for the painting.

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Kevin Farrell
Just in Time
(11" x 16" Oil)

The painting depicts a FedEx MD-11, silhouetted by the late afternoon sun, moments before touching down at Portland (PDX) International Airport.

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Keith Ferris, ASAA
Night Intruders
(24" x 32" Oil)

The first night mission into Laos was to interdict North Vietnam's flow of arms and troops intended to defeat Free South Vietnam. It involved two Air Force Martin B-57 Canberras, led into the area of Tchepone, Laos, by a "Blind Bat" C-130 flare ship escorted by a Marine Douglas EF-10B Skynight radar jamming aircraft to protect the flight from radar controlled antiaircraft guns and missile sites in the Mu Gia Pass area on the North Vietnam/Laos border.

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Peggie Foy
Foggy Morning Take-off
(12" x 24" Oil)

Ring-necked pheasants flushed from the grass by a Curtiss "Hornet" 18-B. In 1918, the Hornet, built with advanced aerodynamic design and powered by Curtiss K-12 engine, attained 163 mph and climbed to 34,610 feet, breaking all world records; however, the end of WWI signaled its early demise.

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George Guzzi
Fokker D.VII at Rhinebeck
(22" x 28" Oil)

I saw my first WWI plane at Rhinebeck, NY and it was my favorite - the Fokker D.VII. All of its vintage planes flew that weekend, except the WWI aircraft. The sky was blue perfect clouds, but too windy, so they gave us a wind check. We got to inspect the WWI planes up close, but alas, didn't see them fly. They taxied them around the grass field.

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Kristin Hill
Vectoring from Thor
(20" x 36" Oil) 

"Vectoring From Thor" depicts a responsibility shared by all pilots. In mythology, the Norse god of thunder Thor and man have a long history of interaction, respect and admiration. In the demanding world of flight, the aircraft's pilot in command must weigh wisely the forces of nature, technology and man's ambitions.

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Charles Kadin
Me and My Shadow
(12" x 24" Oil)

An RCAF Chinook Helicopter flies over vast, lonely, and dangerous red Afghanistan desert on final approach to its Base of Operations.

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Thomas Kalina
Purple Morning Princess
(24" x 36" Oil)

A Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767 flies into a sunrise over the Pacific Ocean. Morning's early light casts a hue of lavender upon the water and clouds. The face of the Hawaiian princess is lit by the logo lights that still remain on as the plane transitions into the daylight.

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Thomas Kalina
I Will Glory in My Duty
(24" x 30" Oil) 

A United States Marine Corps Sikorsky RS-3 flies low across the water on a mission in Nicaragua, circa 1932. The USMC operated only two of the military version of the Sikorsky civil S-38 amphibious aircraft.

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William Kluge
Helios Ascending
(18" x 36" Oil)

An experimental UAV, Helios was designed for high altitude and long duration. Made with ultra lightweight materials and solar powered, low voltage electric motors, Helios could reach over 100,000 ft. altitude and sustain flight above 50,000 ft. for several days.

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Bruce MacKay
Blue Stocking Loner
(16" x 40" Oil)

F.8.DH (de Haviland Mosquito Mk XVI) 653rd Squadron, 25th Bomb Group, 8th Air Force. USAAF.

Unarmed, they relied on their speed and altitude to keep out of trouble. Their missions were flown as lone aircraft with a pilot and a navigator trained in meteorology for weather reconnaissance. The 653rd flew 1,131 'Blue Stocking' meteorological flights.

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Larry Manofsky
Colonel Eileen Collins, Space Shuttle Commander
(48" x 24" Oil and Acrylic)

This is a fanciful portrait of Col. Eileen Collins, USAF, first woman to command a U.S. space mission. She became so on July 23, 1999 when Orbiter Discovery launched to deploy the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Col. Collins has flown on two space shuttle missions as pilot (STS-63 and -84) and has commanded two shuttle missions (STS-93 and -114). She has logged 38 days, 8 hours, 10 minutes in space.

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Michael O'Neal, ASAA
Rote and Weiss
(12" x 24" Oil on Oak Panel Board)

Manfred von Richthofen (the Red Baron) and Hans Weiss (White) overfly the fields of France in 1918. Neither man would survive the war.

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Pati O'Neal
Afternoon Delights
(18" x 24" Oil)

Friends out on an afternoon flight, enjoying the last golden rays of a splendid Georgia day, one in a 1946 Piper Cub and the other in a peaceful hot air balloon.

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Mark Pestana
Farewell to an Icon
(24" x 36" Acrylic)

A Space Shuttle Orbiter departs NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards AFB, California, atop a 747, destined for Kennedy Space Center, Florida. For 30 years the six Orbiters demonstrated versatile capabilities as satellite transporter, engineering repair station, medical laboratory, science observatory, and a construction base for the International Space Station.

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Cher Pruys
Polished
(12" x 7.5" Acrylic and Watercolor)

"Polished" is a portrait of an amazing Beech 18, which has been lovingly prepared for a showing at an air show, most apparent in its incredible shiny finish.

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Sharon Rajnus, ASAA
Boeing PB-1. US Navy -1925
(30" x 22" Oil)

In 1925 the U.S. Navy was looking for a reliable design to fly over 1000's of miles of ocean to Hawaii. The PB1 was Boeing's contribution to the search. Powered by two 800hp Packard engines mounted in tandem, it was one of the largest flying boats of its day.

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David Rawlins
N44V
(30" x 49" Acrylic and Oil)

Piedmont Airlines was based in Winston-Salem NC and flew their first scheduled flight in February 1948 using a DC-3. Piedmont operated 22 DC-3s, retiring the last of them in 1963. N44V is currently owned and operated by the Carolinas Aviation Museum based at the Charlotte-Douglas airport in Charlotte NC.

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Steve Remington
Shared Airspace – Oyster Bay – 1934
(18" x 30" Alkyd)

Arguably the most efficient airplane design ever built, the Bellanca "Airbus" P-200A float plane NC 785W was used as an aerial commuter from the wealthy enclaves of Long Island to Wall Street's East River float for one summer, commencing July 16, 1934, as the New York-Suburban Air Lines. The "Aircruiser" was a successor.

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Paul Rendel, ASAA
Operation Varsity
(24" x 36" Oil)

Waco CG-4A Gliders were used for the most successful and the last use of gliders. It took two hours and 18 minutes from the first aircraft to the last to cross the Rhine River. In 1944, 5000 aircraft and 21,000 men, the allied troops were crossing the Rhine River into Germany during WWll. The 17th Airborne Division men are anxious to get on the ground and do their part.

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Michelle Rouch
Aspiring Pilot
(14" x 11.5" Watercolor)

The child's inspiration starts early when he visits Pima Air & Space Museum in Tucson, Arizona and dreams of flying.

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Douglas Rowe
Another Mission Tomorrow
(16" x 20" Oil)

The day began very early; hours before sunrise, and included a round trip deep into Germany. The damage from the enemy's shells and shrapnel has been repaired as the sun sets over the English countryside. There will be little rest; the Group has been alerted and there is "Another Mission Tomorrow".

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Eldon Slick
In the Rain at Thorpe Abbots
(8" x 10" Oil)

Tribute to the Joes, Sids, Davids, Marks and others who kept the birds of the Bloody 100th fed and flying from Thorpe Abbotts. Selected for exhibition in Imperial War Museum, London.

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Mimi Stuart
Tuskegee Airmen, American Royalty
(24" x 24" Mixed Media)

During WWII, African-Americans vanquished the notion that they "could never fly airplanes." They became such revered aviators that bomber pilots requested "Red Tails" for their most dangerous missions. Official recognition came decades late; yet those brave souls known as the Tuskegee Airmen have conquered our hearts as true American Royalty.

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Charles Thompson, ASAA, GAvA
Somewhere in England
(15.5" x 23.5" Oil)

It is a warm summer morning in 1940 and a Supermarine Spitfire MkI of No.19 Sqdn. sits in the corner of an RAF airfield "Somewhere in England" with its cockpit door open, the pilot's parachute harness resting on the wing and the trolley starter motor connected, just waiting to be scrambled into deadly combat. Mist is rising from a nearby stream and a kingfisher successfully catches his breakfast, completely ignoring the No Fishing sign. The peaceful countryside on the one hand completely belies the imminent presence of war on the other.

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Andrew Whyte, ASAA
Flying Down To Rio
(23" x 29" Oil)

The aircraft in this painting is an S-42 that was used by Pan American Airlines to establish routes from Florida to South America.

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