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2011 ASAA International Aerospace Art Exhibition
Award Winners
The National Museum of Naval Aviation
Pensacola, Florida

To see all the art in the ASAA Exhibit click here

 


Best of the Best


Norm Siegel
Louis Blériot Lors du Premiere Salon de L’Aeronatique à Paris, 1909
(36” X 36” Oil)

The first Paris Air Show opened on October 7, 1909, just 11 weeks after Loius Blériot’s record-breaking solo flight across the English Channel. The “Salon de l’Aeronautique” was an indoor affair held at the magnificent Grand Palais, originally built for the 1900 World’s Fair. A 775,000-sq.-ft. interior was capped by a 162,000-sq.-ft. steel and glass roof and dome. Over 100,000 visitors came to admire the early examples of “airborne mechanical locomotion” and to buy them. There were balloons, dirigibles, biplanes, monoplanes, automobiles, and boats, all spanning the past and present with a peek into the future. Nearly all engine, propeller, tire and canvas suppliers were there, some of which survive today (note the early Michelin man “Bib”). Electricity was new and the exhibit was lit at night by hundreds of globes hanging from the steelwork.
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Commercial

First Place

Charles Thompson
The Graceful Princess
(19.7” X 37.6” Oil)

Three prototypes of a gigantic flying boat intended for commercial service were constructed in Britain between 1943 and 1953. The Saunders Roe Princess was almost as large as the Hughes H.2 Hercules (Spruce Goose) with a 215-foot wingspan and a 330,000-lb takeoff weight. It had the largest pressurized hull ever built, fly-by-wire controls and was designed to carry a 40,000-lb payload at a cruising speed of 360 mph. Power plants were ten 3,780-hp Proteus prop-turbine engines, eight of them coupled in pairs and driving contra-rotating propellers. Only one flew – G-ALUN – before the programme was scrapped.
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Second Place
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Tom Kalina
Purple Morning Princess
(24” X 36” Oil)

A Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767 cruises into a tropical morning sunrise above the Pacific Ocean. Established in 1929 as Inter-Island Airways flying between the islands of Hawaii, the carrier changed its name to Hawaiian Airlines in 1941 to pave the way for eventual trans-Pacific operations.

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Third Place

Kevin Farrell
Just in Time
(11” X 16” Oil)

This painting depicts a Federal Express MD11, silhouetted by the late afternoon sun, moments before touching down at Portland Oregon’s PDX airport.

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Military

First Place

David Rawlins
Winged Warrior
(27” X 48” Oil)

“Winged Warrior” and “Kimmie Kar” also survived the war intact. Both were later scrapped in Kingman, Arizona. “Winged Warrior,” a B-17G of the 95th Bomb Group, was piloted by Robert Newman on nine of his twenty-nine missions during the war. “Kimmie Kar” was piloted by Myron Doxon on at least thirteen missions during his tour. ”Kimmie Kar” was named after Doxon’s daughter. Newman also flew “Kimmie Kar” on one mission. Both Newman and Doxon survived the war and are now retired. Newman lives in Wilmington, North Carolina, and Doxon in Seattle, Washington. “Winged Warrior” and “Kimmie Kar” also survived the war intact. Both were later scrapped in Kingman, Arizona.
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Second Place
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Richard Allison
Corsair
(18” X 24” Oil)

A superlative carrier-based fighter of World War II, the Vought F4U Corsair was originally considered unsuitable for carrier operations. In fact the aircraft was restricted to land bases for more than half of its wartime career. Eventually it was certified for carrier operations in late 1944. Corsairs were also delivered to the British Royal Navy, which successfully operated them in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The Korean War saw the Corsair employed primarily in the ground attack role. The F4U remained in production longer than any other American fighter in World War II.

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Third Place

Andy Browne
Lost Aviator
(12” X 14” Oil)

This is one in a long series of Naval Air paintings that I completed while my brother was serving in the U.S. Navy aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). My brother ejected from his F-14 Tomcat after total loss of hydraulics over the Caribbean in 1983. He survived without serious injury, but it was a horrific night in which three planes and two crewmen were lost.

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Space

First Place
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Mark Bray
Soyuz Express
(18” X 36” Oil)

The Russian Soyuz rocket program has been active since its first unmanned launch in 1963. The program has recorded over 1700 launches since then - a feat no other space program can claim. Today, the Soyuz rocket is used primarily to transport personnel and related equipment to the International Space Station. During the early 1980s, the production of Soyuz launchers reached a peak of 60 per year, making it the world’s most prolific launch platform. “Soyuz Express” captures the grace and beauty of this 50-year-old technology as it leaves earth and heads toward an orbital rendezvous with the International Space Station.

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Second Place

Charles Kadin
Canadarm 2
(14” X 24” Oil)

M.D. Robotics Canadarm made working in space a reality. Astronauts use the Space Shuttle’s Canadian-designed and built robot arm to maneuver astronauts and equipment into any position necessary to service the International Space Station.

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Third Place

John Clark, ASAA
Return from the Moon
(16” X 20” Oil)

The Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) fires its ascent rocket motor and is shown seconds after separating from the LEM descent stage that remains behind on the lunar surface. It is heading for a rendezvous with the Command module orbiting the moon.

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General

First Place

Norm Siegel
Louis Blériot Lors du Premiere Salon de L’Aeronatique à Paris, 1909
(36” X 36” Oil)

The first Paris Air Show opened on October 7, 1909, just 11 weeks after Loius Blériot’s record-breaking solo flight across the English Channel. The “Salon de l’Aeronautique” was an indoor affair held at the magnificent Grand Palais, originally built for the 1900 World’s Fair. A 775,000-sq.-ft. interior was capped by a 162,000-sq.-ft. steel and glass roof and dome. Over 100,000 visitors came to admire the early examples of “airborne mechanical locomotion” and to buy them. There were balloons, dirigibles, biplanes, monoplanes, automobiles, and boats, all spanning the past and present with a peek into the future. Nearly all engine, propeller, tire and canvas suppliers were there, some of which survive today (note the early Michelin man “Bib”). Electricity was new and the exhibit was lit at night by hundreds of globes hanging from the steelwork.
Click on image for larger view


Second Place
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Pati O'Neal
Afternoon Delights
(18” X 24” Oil)

A scene depicting the delight of friends enjoying gorgeous flying weather, accented with the golden rays of a late Georgia afternoon. As one enjoys the peaceful ride of the hot air balloon, the other has fun in the Piper J-3 Cub.

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Third Place
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Cher Pruys
Polished
(12” X 7.5” Acrylic and Watercolor)

This piece is a study of a magnificent Beech 18 that has been prepared for a show. Great attention has been given to this preparation, which is evident in the breath-taking results. It is ready for showing, it is ‘Polished. ‘
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Spirit of Flight Award


Charles Thompson
Somewhere in England
(15.8” X 23.6” Oil)

It is a warm summer morning in 1940 and a Supermarine Spitfire Mk VB of No.19 Sqdn. sits in the corner of an RAF airfield ‘Somewhere in England’ with the cockpit door open, the pilot’s parachute harness resting on the wing and the trolley starter motor connected, just waiting to be scrambled into deadly combat. Mist is rising from a nearby stream and a kingfisher successfully catches his breakfast, completely ignoring the No Fishing sign. The peaceful countryside on the one hand completely belies the imminent presence of war on the other.
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Larry Manofsky
Col. Eileen Collins, Space Shuttle Commander
(48” X 25” Oil and Acrylic)

This is a fanciful portrait of Col. Eileen Collins, USAF. Col. Collins was the first U.S. woman to command a space mission. She achieved this distinction on July 23, 1999, when Orbiter Discovery launched to deploy the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Col. Collins has flown on two space shuttle missions as pilot (STS-63 and -84) and has commanded two shuttle missions (STS-93 and -114). She has logged 38 days, 8 hours, 10 minutes in space. This painting is done in the style of Alphonse Mucha (1860-1939) and includes symbolic elements: the lights of Ireland are in the lower right of the painting in reference to her parent’s immigration from County Cork. Binary code under her name lists her flight numbers. Four shuttles represent her four flights. Col. Collins is placed to bridge the gap between Earth and Moon/Mars with the NASA logo behind her.

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Nixon Galloway
Golden Age of Aviation Award


Craig Kodera
Man, Machine and Sky
(12” X 24” Oil)

As part of the 100th year commemoration of Naval Aviation, a look back at the state-of-the-art during the 25th year anniversary reminds us all just how far military aviation has come. Depicted is a Boeing F4B-4 in the mid 1930s, sporting the always colorful paint scheme which the Navy had designed for its aircraft and the colorful men who flew them. But even with all the technical advances we see today in 2011, flying still comes down to the essence of the earliest days aloft: one man controlling an able machine and being in awe of the natural environment in which they both operate.

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Charles Thompson
The Graceful Princess
(19.7” X 37.6” Oil)

Three prototypes of a gigantic flying boat intended for commercial service were constructed in Britain between 1943 and 1953. The Saunders Roe Princess was almost as large as the Hughes H.2 Hercules (Spruce Goose) with a 215-foot wingspan and a 330,000-lb takeoff weight. It had the largest pressurized hull ever built, fly-by-wire controls and was designed to carry a 40,000-lb payload at a cruising speed of 360 mph. Power plants were ten 3,780-hp Proteus prop-turbine engines, eight of them coupled in pairs and driving contra-rotating propellers. Only one flew – G-ALUN – before the programme was scrapped.
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Captain Duane Whitney Martin Award


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Pete Wenman
By the Dawn's Early Light
(24” X 36” Oil)

This painting depicts F-4B Phantoms from VF-151 on an early morning mission over North Vietnam, August 1972. NF 213 is piloted by John Chesire, with RIO George Healey; Ted Triebel pilots NF 210 with RIO Dave Everett. Dave and Ted were shot down on August 27, 1972, on a photo escort mission over North Vietnam; they spent the rest of the war as POWs in the infamous Hanoi Hilton. Everett recalls, “Aside from the very occasional MiGCAP, the best hops [flights] a JO could draw were the armed recces [reconnaissance missions] in Route Pack 5/6 at first light -- targets of opportunity as mostly we defined them, hoping to catch those night trucks trying to squeeze in a few extra kilometers before parking under the trees for the day. (Don’t think that scenario didn’t occur to Ted and I when we were being trucked to Hanoi). RIP to NF210 in a zillion pieces on a karst ridge in Thanh Hoa Province, lost on one of those low-altitude, go-fast, flak-magnet, Baby Giant photo escort missions that we all came to enjoy, on 7 August over Phu Ly Bridge, when all hell broke loose and luck petered out.”
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ForeFeathers
Plaque du Beaque


Larry Manofsky
Col. Eileen Collins, Space Shuttle Commander
(48” X 25” Oil and Acrylic)

This is a fanciful portrait of Col. Eileen Collins, USAF. Col. Collins was the first U.S. woman to command a space mission. She achieved this distinction on July 23, 1999, when Orbiter Discovery launched to deploy the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Col. Collins has flown on two space shuttle missions as pilot (STS-63 and -84) and has commanded two shuttle missions (STS-93 and -114). She has logged 38 days, 8 hours, 10 minutes in space. This painting is done in the style of Alphonse Mucha (1860-1939) and includes symbolic elements: the lights of Ireland are in the lower right of the painting in reference to her parent’s immigration from County Cork. Binary code under her name lists her flight numbers. Four shuttles represent her four flights. Col. Collins is placed to bridge the gap between Earth and Moon/Mars with the NASA logo behind her.

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James V. Roy, Jr. Award

Larry Manofsky
Col. Eileen Collins, Space Shuttle Commander
(48” X 25” Oil and Acrylic)

This is a fanciful portrait of Col. Eileen Collins, USAF. Col. Collins was the first U.S. woman to command a space mission. She achieved this distinction on July 23, 1999, when Orbiter Discovery launched to deploy the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Col. Collins has flown on two space shuttle missions as pilot (STS-63 and -84) and has commanded two shuttle missions (STS-93 and -114). She has logged 38 days, 8 hours, 10 minutes in space. This painting is done in the style of Alphonse Mucha (1860-1939) and includes symbolic elements: the lights of Ireland are in the lower right of the painting in reference to her parent’s immigration from County Cork. Binary code under her name lists her flight numbers. Four shuttles represent her four flights. Col. Collins is placed to bridge the gap between Earth and Moon/Mars with the NASA logo behind her.

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Award of Distinction

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Russell Smith
Two Birds with One Stone
(27” X 44” Oil)

This painting depicts an engagement on September 6, 1918, in which Captain H.P. Lale and 2/Lt H.L. Edwards of 20 Sq RAF achieved simultaneous victories against Fokker DVIIs while flying Bristol F2b E2181.

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Award of Merit

Norm Siegel
Louis Blériot Lors du Premiere Salon de L’Aeronatique à Paris, 1909
(36” X 36” Oil)

The first Paris Air Show opened on October 7, 1909, just 11 weeks after Loius Blériot’s record-breaking solo flight across the English Channel. The “Salon de l’Aeronautique” was an indoor affair held at the magnificent Grand Palais, originally built for the 1900 World’s Fair. A 775,000-sq.-ft. interior was capped by a 162,000-sq.-ft. steel and glass roof and dome. Over 100,000 visitors came to admire the early examples of “airborne mechanical locomotion” and to buy them. There were balloons, dirigibles, biplanes, monoplanes, automobiles, and boats, all spanning the past and present with a peek into the future. Nearly all engine, propeller, tire and canvas suppliers were there, some of which survive today (note the early Michelin man “Bib”). Electricity was new and the exhibit was lit at night by hundreds of globes hanging from the steelwork.
Click on image for larger view


Keith Ferris
NAVAIR Rising
(24” X 32” Acrylic)

Naval Aviator #1, Lieutenant Theodore “Spuds” Ellyson, is seen flying Naval Aircraft #1, Curtiss A-1 Triad, crossing the Silver Strand below the Hotel Del Coronado, Coronado, California in July 1911. The Triad was the first seaplane to fly in this country, the first amphibious aircraft, the first aircraft with retractable landing gear and the first U.S. Naval aircraft. It was named “Triad” for its ability to operate from land or sea or air.

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Honorable Mention

Steve Anderson
Guardians of the Pacific
(18” X 36” Oil)

The Boeing F4B-4 served as the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps first-line fighter from mid-1932 until 1937-38. The year is 1932. The squadron Commanding Officer leads the first section of VF-6 during fleet exercises off the California coast. A growing threat looms beyond the western horizon.

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Steve Heyen
Agility, Speed and Beauty
(21” X 46” Oil)

Spitfire MkIA flown by pilot officer J.C. “Cocky” Dundas of 609 Squadron RAF is shown in action over the English Coast.

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Paul Rendel
Reaper Over Afghanistan
(24” X 28” Oil)

The combat-proven Reaper unmanned aircraft flies long-endurance surveillance, reconnaissance and attack missions, while streaming real-time imagery to anywhere in the world.

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Mark Bray
Soyuz Express
(18” X 36” Oil)

The Russian Soyuz rocket program has been active since its first unmanned launch in 1963. The program has recorded over 1700 launches since then - a feat no other space program can claim. Today, the Soyuz rocket is used primarily to transport personnel and related equipment to the International Space Station. During the early 1980s, the production of Soyuz launchers reached a peak of 60 per year, making it the world’s most prolific launch platform. “Soyuz Express” captures the grace and beauty of this 50-year-old technology as it leaves earth and heads toward an orbital rendezvous with the International Space Station.

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Wade Meyers
One of the Few
(12” X 24” Oil)

Twenty-three-year-old Hurricane pilot Flight Lieutenant James B. “Nick” Nicolson of 249 Squadron is shown suiting up prior to a sortie. Nicolson won the only Victoria Cross awarded to a pilot during the famous Battle of Britain, and he was the only Royal Air Force fighter pilot to receive the award during World War II. The “VC” is the highest military honor awarded for bravery in action to a British or Commonwealth service member. It is equivalent to the U.S. Medal of Honor.

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ASAA Founders' Gold Award
Unjuried

Wade Meyers
The Sadr City Flying Club

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ASAA Founders' Silver Award
Unjuried


Mark Pestana
Blue Angel 7

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Mark Bray
Seahawk Approach

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ASAA Founders' Associate Member Recognition Award
Unjuried


Werner Hauptli
Southwest Airlines Boeing B-737 taking a nap at BWI Airport

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Merana Cardorette
Impressions of a Seahawk Crew

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Matt Jefferies Popular Choice
Unjuried

Kristin Hill
Operation Fish Hawk: Classified

May 1964 the CIA conducted two top secret reconnaissance flights with the U-2 to gather information about clandestine French nuclear tests on the Mururoa Atoll, French Polynesia. Two U-2G aircraft, specially modified for carrier take off and landing, flew secretly to the carrier USS Ranger off Hawaii. Select U-2 pilots were trained to be carrier qualified in this high altitude, tandem landing gear aircraft that was known to be difficult to fly and land under any conditions. The USS Ranger cruised undercover for a week to a position 800 miles off French Polynesia where two reconnaissance sorties were flown undetected. The mission was successful and the information gathered was invaluable to US international relations.

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Mattt Jefferies Popular Choice - Art Created on Site
Unjuried

Gerry Asher
Bob's Office

"It was inspired because the subject aircraft had been a Battle Of Midway veteran, flying with the Marines VMSB-241. I met an old man back in high school in my ‘hanging around the airport’ days named Bob Kafka, who had been a radioman/gunner with that squadron at Midway; I figured there was a fair chance he might have occupied that back seat at some point."

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