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2011 ASAA
International Aerospace Art Exhibition
The National Museum of Naval Aviation
Pensacola, Florida

All art in the Exhibit is displayed on this page.
To see the award winning art, click here

Robert G. Aikins
Hero of Midway
(16” X 20” Oil)

The U.S. Navy Douglas SBD-5 Dauntless should be counted among the most important aircraft of the 20th century. At the Battle of Midway on June 4, 1942, Dauntless dive-bombers turned the tide of the Pacific War. The Dauntless in this painting appeared at the “Thunder over Michigan” Air Show at the Willow Run Airport, Michigan, in August, 2004.

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Robert G. Aikins
Thunderbirds
(22” X 28” Oil)


Description: The General Dynamics (Lockheed Martin) F-16C Fighting Falcons pictured in this painting belong to the world famous U.S. Air Force aerial demonstration team, the Thunderbirds. Shown are two of the team as they appeared in May 2009 at the Armed Forces Day Air Show at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland.

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Richard Allison
Seahawk
(11” X 14” Oil)

During World War II, the U.S. Navy requested a ship-borne reconnaissance aircraft similar to the seaplane version of the famous Japanese “Zero.” Arguably the best Navy floatplane of all time, the Curtiss SC Seahawk also proved to be the last. Advances in radar along with the development of shipboard helicopters rendered floatplanes obsolete. The last flight of the Seahawk took place in 1949.

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Richard Allison
Corsair
(18” X 24” Oil)

A superlative carrier-based fighter of World War II, the Vought F4U Corsair was originally considered unsuitable for carrier operations. In fact the aircraft was restricted to land bases for more than half of its wartime career. Eventually it was certified for carrier operations in late 1944. Corsairs were also delivered to the British Royal Navy, which successfully operated them in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. The Korean War saw the Corsair employed primarily in the ground attack role. The F4U remained in production longer than any other American fighter in World War II.

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Steve Anderson
Guardians of the Pacific
(18” X 36” Oil)

The Boeing F4B-4 served as the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps first-line fighter from mid-1932 until 1937-38. The year is 1932. The squadron Commanding Officer leads the first section of VF-6 during fleet exercises off the California coast. A growing threat looms beyond the western horizon.

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Gerald Asher
Wymond’s Show
(24” X 36” Oil)

Following William Wyler’s color documentary on the B-17 Memphis Belle, the award-winning director filmed a similar work depicting the activities of a Corsica-based Army Air Forces fighter-bomber unit. Titled “Thunderbolt,” the film focused on LTC Gilbert O. Wymond and his command of the 65th Fighter Squadron of the 57th Fighter Group. Here, Wymond rolls in to lead his wingman in a dive-bombing strike against enemy-held bridges in central Italy as part of Operation Strangle in the summer of 1944.

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Gerald Asher
Swing Shift Scrapper
(18” X 24” Oil)

A Grumman AF-2S Guardian of Air Antisubmarine Squadron 37 prowls the Pacific waters as twilight gathers in the sky above. Designed originally as a high speed torpedo scout bomber to replace the TBF Avenger, the mission evolved into antisubmarine warfare by the time the aircraft reached operational use in the early 1950s. Operating in two-ship teams, the radar equipped AF-2W “hunter” would seek out a submarine and direct the AF-2S “killer” (or “scrapper”) to the intended victim. The actual aircraft design was very troublesome, and once deployed, the Guardian had a fairly high accident rate in shipboard operations. It was eventually replaced with Grumman’s S2F Tracker in 1955.

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Gerald Asher
Buckaroo Banzai’s PA-3
(16” X 20” Oil)

Alone at last, Student Naval Aviator Alex Durr (nicknamed “Buckaroo Banzai”) wrings out his Beech T-34C Turbo Mentor on his first solo aerobatic hop in 1984. Though his Marine Corps career would eventually lead him to assignments in the F-4 Phantom and F/A-18 Hornet, it’s a safe bet that the pure adrenaline rush of first-time solo aerobatics will be difficult to match. Now a pilot for American Airlines, he retained his Reserve commission in the Marines Corps. Lieutenant Colonel Durr is currently on active duty with the Marines in Afghanistan.

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Giampalo Baglioni
Summer Reflections
(31.5” X 39.4” Oil)

A Corsair F4U-5, S/N 122179, sits majestically under the summer sun of Oshkosh. A continuing presence at Warbirds shows, it flew with the 736th Squadron of VMF-312 during the Korean conflict. The “5” is a post-war Corsair; production started in 1946. The first flight of a production “5” was in October 1, 1947. The F4U-5 was powered with the R-2800-32W engine, which boasted 2,300 hp at sea level. It had a maximum speed of 480 mph at 26,800 feet and a rate of climb of 5,240 feet per minute. A total of 468 F4U-5 models was built.

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Jim Balletto
Cat Herders
(20” X 30” Watercolor)

A lighthearted look at a U.S. Navy carrier flight deck crew as it prepares to launch an F-14 Tomcat.
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Brian Bateman
Back Tulip on Final
(20” X 30” Oil)

Erich Hartmann is shown in his Me-109G-14 on final approach to Veszprem, Hungary, in the winter of 1945. The war was almost over, and soon the clouds of war would give way to peace and rebuilding after years of turmoil.

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Mark Bray
Soyuz Express
(18” X 36” Oil)

The Russian Soyuz rocket program has been active since its first unmanned launch in 1963. The program has recorded over 1700 launches since then - a feat no other space program can claim. Today, the Soyuz rocket is used primarily to transport personnel and related equipment to the International Space Station. During the early 1980s, the production of Soyuz launchers reached a peak of 60 per year, making it the world’s most prolific launch platform. “Soyuz Express” captures the grace and beauty of this 50-year-old technology as it leaves earth and heads toward an orbital rendezvous with the International Space Station.

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Mark Bray
Tail Rotor Triage
(10” X 14” Oil)

This art captures the interaction that must exist between man and machine – a relationship necessary to the survival of both. A pre-flight inspection is being performed on the tail rotor section of a U.S. Navy Seahawk. These inspections are a required part of daily operations on any flight line. This Seahawk is part of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 41 (HSM-41), the Seahawks, based at NAS North Island, San Diego, California. This is a helicopter training squadrons, as indicated by the “TS” on the tail rotor pylon.

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Mark Bray
Bent Wing Brawl
(22” X 30” Watercolor)

Flying an F4U-4 Corsair with the Checkerboards of attack squadron VMA-312 off of the USS Bataan on September 10, 1952, Marine Corps Captain Jesse Folmar encounters several MiG 15s in the skies over North Korea. Banking into the quickly approaching MiGs, the #9 Corsair opens fire just as the lead MiG overshoots and crosses directly in front of it. Captain Folmar has just become the first American in a propeller driven aircraft to down a jet fighter. This painting depicts Capt. Folmar in his #9 Corsair as he turns directly into the MiGs just seconds before the now famous shoot-down.

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Andy Browne
Lost Aviator
(12” X 14” Oil)

This is one in a long series of Naval Air paintings that I completed while my brother was serving in the U.S. Navy aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). My brother ejected from his F-14 Tomcat after total loss of hydraulics over the Caribbean in 1983. He survived without serious injury, but it was a horrific night in which three planes and two crewmen were lost.

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Sather Bruguiere
Old Control Tower at Del Rio
(8.5” X 12.5” Oil)

The old control tower, the cab long gone, still stands above the ramps and hangars at Del Rio, Texas. The tower was built early in World War II, as the local field was converted into a military flight-training base. Today, all that remains of that incredible time is the proud skeleton of a once very busy, very hot, and dusty place on the Rio Grande with the sun blazing down

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Ross Buckland
Bear and Wet
(20” X 30” Oil)

A Noorduyn Norseman V of the Ontario Provincial Air Service, in its natural northern bush environment, invites an inspection by a curious passer-by.

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Merana Cadorette
Off Duty at the ‘I’ Bar
(16” X 22” Watercolor)

These gentlemen must have been hoping for a nice break when they went to the officers club on base in San Diego. Little did they realize that ASAA artists had invaded the club that evening. I was taken by their obvious camaraderie, professionalism, and character. Rarely is a painting as much pure fun to do as this one–how could it not be with these four faces peering back from the paper? The collection of personal autographs on military prints is an interesting phenomenon to artists not focused on this specialty. I thought it would be fun to treat this as a “mission” and ask for their signatures. All four graciously complied, one sent patches, and to cap it all off, Captain Mike Kelly provided this set of Professional Aviation Maintenance Officer wings, as it is “their chosen career field that binds the four of them together professionally.” Cheers, gentlemen, and thank you.

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Hank Caruso
Sticks, Strings, and Sandbags
(11" X 14" Ink & Prismacolor)

The official birth of Naval Aviation is established as 8 May 1911, when the U.S. Navy requisitioned its first aircraft. But for many the real genesis of Naval Aviation came four months earlier. That was when civilian Eugene Ely flew his Curtiss pusher biplane onto a makeshift wooden deck on the armored cruiser USS Pennsylvania for the world’s first carrier landing (“trap”). Ely wore rubber inner tubes as life preservers and hooks on his aircraft snagged ropes stretched between sandbags lining both sides of the deck.

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Hank Caruso
One Plus One Equals Zero
(11" X 14" Ink & Prismacolor)

Project Gemini is perhaps the least appreciated phase of the U.S. Space Program in the 1960s. Larger than the one-man Mercury spacecraft, Gemini could keep two astronauts in orbit for as long as 13 days. Gemini missions pioneered extra-vehicular activity (“space walks”) and orbital rendezvous techniques. It was also the first manned spacecraft that could change its orbit as well as its attitude. Unfortunately, the rendezvous goals of astronauts Tom Stafford and Gene Cernan, the crew of Gemini IX-A, were thwarted by a recalcitrant target vehicle that just wouldn’t open its jaws wide enough to allow the two spacecraft to join up.

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Hank Caruso
Sink the Hwachon
(11" X 14" Ink & Prismacolor)

During the Korean War attempts to destroy the Hwachon Dam with conventional bombing just didn’t work. On 1 May 1951, Douglas AD-4 Skyraiders from VA-195 – subsequently known as the Dambusters – dropped Mk 13 aerial torpedoes to breach the dam. F4U Corsairs suppressed flak guns and F9F-2P photo-Panthers provided damage assessment photography. (Many thanks to CDR Bob Bennett, USN Ret., one of the Dambusters who flew this amazing mission, for acting as technical advisor for this illustration.)

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Douglas Castleman
SH-60 Seahawk
(12” X 24” Oil)

A Sikorsky SH-60 Seahawk is being checked before flight.

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John Clark, ASAA
The Evaluators
(30” X 40” Oil)

This is an F-4J Phantom II of VX-4 Test and Evaluation Squadron based at NAS China Lake. The gloss black paint was tested to determine if it would make the aircraft less visible during night flights. The end results, however, were disappointing. This famous black aircraft with the well-known rabbit’s head logo on its tail was known as the “Black Bunny.” The addition of the white Playboy Bunny Logo to the tail of the aircraft came about when Naval paint crews saw a black gloss DC-9, which was owned by Playboy Magazine’s Hugh Hefner, emblazoned with the white Playboy Bunny on the vertical stabilizer. Taking their cue from this aircraft, the Navy crew in the paint shop added the Bunny Logo to the F-4J. Mr. Hefner had no objections to this use of the Bunny. On an American Society of Aviation Artists’ trip to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, the group came across this aircraft. Upon seeing the Playboy Bunny on the vertical stabilizer...two members struck a pose.

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John Clark, ASAA
Return from the Moon
(16” X 20” Oil)

The Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) fires its ascent rocket motor and is shown seconds after separating from the LEM descent stage that remains behind on the lunar surface. It is heading for a rendezvous with the Command module orbiting the moon.

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Steve Cox
Sirius business
(24” X 30” Acrylic)

This painting depicts Paul Mantz and cameraman Elmer Dyer filming a scene for the 1940 film, “Men with Wings,“ from a Lockheed Sirius 8C, one of many camera aircraft operated by Mantz. An ex-United Airlines Boeing 247D masquerades as the Falconer “secret bomber,“ pursued by two Army P-12s (Boeing Model 100s). The Sirius was modified with a 360-degree camera mount in the rear cockpit, an enlarged windscreen, and removal of the turtledeck fairing (the aircraft was originally delivered with enclosed cockpits that interfered with filming).

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T.J. Cronley
Sunset and Round Motors, 1961
(20” X 30” Oil)

A Grumman S2F Tracker cruises by San Clemente Island late one afternoon in the days leading up to events in Southeast Asia that would be far less tranquil.

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Lou Drendel
Afghan Osprey
(18” X 24” Acrylic)

The Bell/Boeing MV-22 Osprey was deployed to Afghanistan in 2008, with Marine Corps Medium Tiltrotor Squadron VMM-261. The Osprey is a revolutionary aircraft, both in design and capability. Its ability to take off and land vertically, combined with the speed and range of a conventional turboprop aircraft, provides a quantum leap in mission planning for troop insertions, emergency evacuations, and a wide spectrum of special operations

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Gary Elshoff
Buster's Ride
(21” X 28” Stained Glass)

This custom stained glass panel depicts a Vought F-8E Crusader flown by Lt.JG. Mike Lane (call-sign “Buster”) when assigned to VC-10. The aircraft glass is mostly opalescent grey-white, with white opal accents. The details are made with vitreous paints, each color kiln-fired separately. The background is sky blue-white wispy glass, the border is dark blue-white wispy glass, and the corners are gold trans-opal. Each piece is copper-foiled and the seams soldered, then toned with copper patina. The frame is aluminum channel.

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Kevin Farrell
Just in Time
(11” X 16” Oil)

This painting depicts a Federal Express MD11, silhouetted by the late afternoon sun, moments before touching down at Portland Oregon’s PDX airport.

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Keith Ferris
The First Phantom
(18” X 24” Oil)

The McDonnell XFD-1 Phantom became the first American turbine-powered aircraft to operate from an aircraft carrier when the first Phantom I, piloted by Lt. Commander James Davidson, landed and took off from the USS Franklin D. Roosevelt on 21 July 1946.

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Keith Ferris
NAVAIR Rising
(24” X 32” Acrylic)

Naval Aviator #1, Lieutenant Theodore “Spuds” Ellyson, is seen flying Naval Aircraft #1, Curtiss A-1 Triad, crossing the Silver Strand below the Hotel Del Coronado, Coronado, California in July 1911. The Triad was the first seaplane to fly in this country, the first amphibious aircraft, the first aircraft with retractable landing gear and the first U.S. Naval aircraft. It was named “Triad” for its ability to operate from land or sea or air.

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Robert D. Fiacco
The Downing of Flogger
(36" X 48" Oil)

On the morning of January 4, 1989, two U.S. Navy F-14s from VF-32, AC207 (CDR Joseph Bernard Connelly/CDR Leo F. Enwright 159610) and AC202 (LT Hermon C. Cook III/LCDR Steven Patrick Collins 159437) were on Combat Air Patrol in the Gulf of Sidra when four Libyan MiG-23 Floggers were detected heading towards the battle group. The Tomcats illuminated the Floggers, but they accelerated and continued to approach the USS John F. Kennedy. The lead Tomcat (AC207), after observing hostile maneuvering, attacked one of the Floggers with an AIM-7 Sparrow missile without success. At 6 nm the Tomcats split and the Floggers followed the wingman (AC204) while the lead Tomcat circled to get a tail angle on them. The wingman engaged with a Sparrow and downed one of the Libyan aircraft. The lead Tomcat (AC207) closed on the second Flogger from the rear quadrant and at 1.5 nm fired a Sidewinder missile, which hit the Flogger. The painting shows CDRs Connelly and Enwright successfully downing the second Flogger.

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Robert D. Fiacco
Oriskany Rendezvous
(48” X 48” Oil)

A-4C Skyhawks from VA-94, assigned to USS Hancock, fly past the USS Oriskany (CVA-34) prior to striking targets in North Vietnam in 1967. USS Oriskany was one of 24 Essex-class aircraft carriers completed during or shortly after World War II for the U.S. Navy. The ship was the third U.S. Navy ship to bear the name, and was named for the Revolutionary War Battle of Oriskany.

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Michael A. Goss
A Naval Aviator Dream
(12” X 24” oil)

The T-45 pilot prepares for launch from the USS John F. Kennedy during carrier qualifications in the Atlantic Ocean. The T-45 Goshawk is a tandem-seat, carrier capable, jet trainer whose mission is to train Navy and Marine Corps pilots.

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James Green
Itinerant Fliers
(15” X 20” Acrylic, Gouache and Colored Pencil)

The immaculately restored Lockheed Model 12 owned by Joe Shepherd of Fayetteville, Georgia, is the subject of this study in polished aluminum. My desire to emphasize the workmanship that went into the building and restoration of this magnificent aircraft is what motivated me to use this composition with the cardinal resting on the antenna. The title was derived from the migratory nature of birds and air show attendees.

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Steve Heyen
Agility, Speed and Beauty
(21” X 46” Oil)

Spitfire MkIA flown by pilot officer J.C. “Cocky” Dundas of 609 Squadron RAF is shown in action over the English Coast.

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Steve Heyen
Attack on Bodo Harbor
(21” X 23” Oil)

Douglas SBD Dauntless dive-bombers based on the carrier USS Ranger approach targets in Bodo Harbor, Norway, on October 4th, 1943.

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Charles Kadin
Canadarm 2
(14” X 24” Oil)

M.D. Robotics Canadarm made working in space a reality. Astronauts use the Space Shuttle’s Canadian-designed and built robot arm to maneuver astronauts and equipment into any position necessary to service the International Space Station.

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Charles Kadin
FOBs by Air
(16” X 28” Oil)

Starting in 2008, the mighty CH-47 Chinook helicopter allowed the Canadian Air Force to move troops to Forward Operating Bases (FOBs) in Afghanistan in relative safety. Previously, travel by road constantly exposed them to Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), which took a toll in lives and casualties.

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Charles Kadin
Me and My Shadow
(12” X 24” Oil)

A Canadian CH-47 Chinook flying over the vast red Afghanistan desert approaches its operating base. Chinook helicopter operations are normally escorted by the heavily armed CH-146 Griffon helicopter.

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Tom Kalina
Purple Morning Princess
(24” X 36” Oil)

A Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767 cruises into a tropical morning sunrise above the Pacific Ocean. Established in 1929 as Inter-Island Airways flying between the islands of Hawaii, the carrier changed its name to Hawaiian Airlines in 1941 to pave the way for eventual trans-Pacific operations.

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Tom Kalina
I Will Glory in My Duty
(30” X 24” Oil)

A U.S. Marine Corps Sikorsky RS-3 flies low along a coastline on a reconnaissance mission. The RS-3 was the military designation for the civilian Sikorsky S-38. This aircraft was received at the U.S. Naval Air Station at Anacostia, D.C., on May 10, 1931 (Bureau Number A-8922 and coded 6J4). One year later, it was sent to Quantico, Virginia. From June of 1932 until February of 1933, it was stationed in Nicaragua, which was being policed by the Marine Corps. The aircraft was stricken from the Navy’s roster on March 30, 1935.

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Craig Kodera
Into the Slot
(12” X 16” Acrylic)

Before Marine Corps Major Gregory “Pappy” Boyington was given a resurrected VMF-214 from which he created the famed Black Sheep Squadron, VMF-214 was a typical Marine fighter squadron equipped with the Grumman F4F Wildcat. The squadron joined other Marine units on Guadalcanal in the Solomons Islands chain. On their first day of combat, 7 April 1943, several Japanese Val dive bombers were shot down and dropped “into the Slot” between Guadalcanal and Tulagi. Zero fighter escorts then attacked the Marines, as shown here. For VMF-214 it was a Baptism by fire and proved successful for the Leathernecks. This image was commissioned by author Bruce Gamble for his most recent book.

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Craig Kodera
Man, Machine and Sky
(12” X 24” Oil)

As part of the 100th year commemoration of Naval Aviation, a look back at the state-of-the-art during the 25th year anniversary reminds us all just how far military aviation has come. Depicted is a Boeing F4B-4 in the mid 1930s, sporting the always colorful paint scheme which the Navy had designed for its aircraft and the colorful men who flew them. But even with all the technical advances we see today in 2011, flying still comes down to the essence of the earliest days aloft: one man controlling an able machine and being in awe of the natural environment in which they both operate.

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Larry Manofsky
Col. Eileen Collins, Space Shuttle Commander
(48” X 25” Oil and Acrylic)

This is a fanciful portrait of Col. Eileen Collins, USAF. Col. Collins was the first U.S. woman to command a space mission. She achieved this distinction on July 23, 1999, when Orbiter Discovery launched to deploy the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Col. Collins has flown on two space shuttle missions as pilot (STS-63 and -84) and has commanded two shuttle missions (STS-93 and -114). She has logged 38 days, 8 hours, 10 minutes in space. This painting is done in the style of Alphonse Mucha (1860-1939) and includes symbolic elements: the lights of Ireland are in the lower right of the painting in reference to her parent’s immigration from County Cork. Binary code under her name lists her flight numbers. Four shuttles represent her four flights. Col. Collins is placed to bridge the gap between Earth and Moon/Mars with the NASA logo behind her.

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Vincent Meslet
The Whale
(10.6” X 13.7” Oil)

“The Whale” was the nickname of the A-3 Skywarrior. This unusually camouflaged version is an RA-3B used by the U.S. Navy for reconnaissance over the Ho Chi Min trail in Vietnam in the 1970s.

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Wade Meyers
One of the Few
(12” X 24” Oil)

Twenty-three-year-old Hurricane pilot Flight Lieutenant James B. “Nick” Nicolson of 249 Squadron is shown suiting up prior to a sortie. Nicolson won the only Victoria Cross awarded to a pilot during the famous Battle of Britain, and he was the only Royal Air Force fighter pilot to receive the award during World War II. The “VC” is the highest military honor awarded for bravery in action to a British or Commonwealth service member. It is equivalent to the U.S. Medal of Honor.

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Wade Meyers
The Yielding Sky
(20” X 48” Oil)

Royal Air Force Capt. Gwilym H. Lewis and a couple of 40 Squadron mates wing their way into a magnificent French sky in May 1918. Lewis is at the controls of “The Artful Dodger,” his personal SE5a. The ace claimed four of his twelve victories in serial D3540, code letter “K”. As the officer commanding “B” Flight, his banner streams from the rudder.

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Wade Meyers
Daydreams over Cambridgeshire
(20” X 40” Oil)

A flight of P-51 Mustangs from the 8th Air Force’s 361st Fighter Group “Yellow Jackets” are seen over England returning from a combat mission in early August 1944. The Mustangs are descending to penetrate the thick overcast blanketing the area of their home base of Bottisham, Cambridgeshire. Typically, only the flight leader flew instruments in the clouds; his “chicks” kept him in sight by flying close formation.

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Crissie Murphy
For Those Who Keep 'Em Flying
(22” X 28” Acrylic)

This painting is a tribute to the behind-the-scenes efforts that the success of a mission–and so many lives–depends on. En route to Haiti following the earthquake to document Operation Unified Response, we had a stop over in Guantanamo. While I was there, I had the opportunity to sketch the maintenance work being performed on the helicopters used in the operation. The crews were very friendly, as if it was the most normal thing in the world to have someone sitting there with a sketchbook while they worked at, as one mechanic told me, “Doing whatever we can to keep ‘em in the air.”

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Vnhan Nguyen
Flight to Pleiku, South Vietnam
(18” X 26” Acrylic)

This painting is a tribute to fallen heroes in Vietnam.

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Michael O'Neal
Three Miles From Pola
(36” X 36” Oil)

The first Medal of Honor awarded a U.S. Naval Aviator went to Ensign Charles H. Hammann for his rescue of Ensign George Ludlow. Ludlow was shot down just off the Austrian coast on 21 August 1918. Picked up by Hammann, who made his takeoff in three-foot swells, Ludlow rode some 60 miles back to Porto Corsini, Italy, beneath the engine of the single-seat Macchi M-5 fighter.

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Michael O'Neal
Dear Old SPAD
(12” X 24” Oil)

The SPAD XIII of 2/Lt. Philip Kissam flies leisurely over France immediately after World War I. In 1978 I presented the then 83-year-old Kissam with a similar drawing of his airplane flown more than 60 years before. He picked up the drawing and went silent for moment, then, nearly inaudibly, uttered “Dear Old SPAD…”

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Pati O'Neal
Taylorcraft Heading Home
(18” X 24” Oil)

At the end of a clear Wisconsin afternoon, with the landscape complete with hay bales and silos capturing the last golden glints of a setting sun, a 1946 Taylorcraft taxis in to come to home to roost.

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Pati O'Neal
Afternoon Delights
(18” X 24” Oil)

A scene depicting the delight of friends enjoying gorgeous flying weather, accented with the golden rays of a late Georgia afternoon. As one enjoys the peaceful ride of the hot air balloon, the other has fun in the Piper J-3 Cub.

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Mark Pestana
Farewell to an Icon
(24” X 36” Acrylic)

Mounted atop a B747 carrier aircraft, a Space Shuttle orbiter departs Edwards AFB Runway 04R, over Rogers Dry Lake, near NASA’s Dryden Flight Research Center, California. For 30 years the venerable orbiters – Columbia, Atlantis, Challenger, Discovery, Endeavour, and the Enterprise, which was flown in atmospheric glide tests – proved to be the most complex and successful machines to serve humankind. The spacecraft demonstrated its versatile capabilities as a satellite transport, repair station, medical and engineering laboratory, Earth and space observatory, logistics carrier, and as a construction base for the International Space Station.

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Cher Pruys
Polished
(12” X 7.5” Acrylic and Watercolor)

This piece is a study of a magnificent Beech 18 that has been prepared for a show. Great attention has been given to this preparation, which is evident in the breath-taking results. It is ready for showing, it is ‘Polished. ‘
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Sharon Rajnus
Boeing PB-1, U.S. Navy -1925
(24” X 36” Oil)

In 1925 the U.S. Navy was looking for a reliable design to fly over thousands of miles of ocean to Hawaii. The PB-1 was Boeing’s contribution to the search. Powered by two 800-hp Packard engines mounted in tandem, it was one of the largest flying boats of its day.
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David Rawlins
Kingfishers Return to the Showboat
(24” X 48” Acrylic)

This painting depicts two OS2U Kingfishers returning to the USS North Carolina. A North Carolina Kingfisher was instrumental in one of the more dramatic rescues of the war. On April 30, 1944, Lt. John Burns rescued ten downed air crewmen from Truk Lagoon. Unable to takeoff because of the number of extra passengers, and with men sitting on the wings or holding on to the fuselage, Burns taxied his Kingfisher for twenty miles to the submarine USS Tang, a trip that took six hours. Subsequently, Burn’s Kingfisher was unable to take off because of a flooded pontoon and lack of fuel, and was sunk by the Tang.
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David Rawlins
Winged Warrior
(27” X 48” Oil)

“Winged Warrior” and “Kimmie Kar” also survived the war intact. Both were later scrapped in Kingman, Arizona. “Winged Warrior,” a B-17G of the 95th Bomb Group, was piloted by Robert Newman on nine of his twenty-nine missions during the war. “Kimmie Kar” was piloted by Myron Doxon on at least thirteen missions during his tour. ”Kimmie Kar” was named after Doxon’s daughter. Newman also flew “Kimmie Kar” on one mission. Both Newman and Doxon survived the war and are now retired. Newman lives in Wilmington, North Carolina, and Doxon in Seattle, Washington. “Winged Warrior” and “Kimmie Kar” also survived the war intact. Both were later scrapped in Kingman, Arizona.
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Steve Remington
Harriet Quimby - Channel Obscured
(Alkyd 18" x 36")

Flying a borrowed Bleriot XI, American aviatrix Harriet Quimby took off from Dover, England, on April 16, 1912, in an attempt to become the first woman to fly solo between England and France. Aiming fo Calais, Quimby missed her destination and landed thirty miles from Calais near Hardelot, France. Afterwards she wrote "In an instant I was beyond the cliffs and over the channel. Far beneath I saw the Mirrors tug with its stream of black smoke...Then the thickening fog obscured my view, Calais was out of sight. I could not see ahead of me or at all below."


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Paul Rendel
Reaper Over Afghanistan
(24” X 28” Oil)

The combat-proven Reaper unmanned aircraft flies long-endurance surveillance, reconnaissance and attack missions, while streaming real-time imagery to anywhere in the world.

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John-Thomas Richard
Spitfire Wall
(9” X 12” X 10" Ceramic Sculpture)

This is a wall-hanging ceramic airplane, weighing 3-4 pounds. The idea for this work comes from World War II aircraft spotter identification cards for the Spitfire. From that outline, I can then build the aircraft structure coming out from it.

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Michelle Rouch
Pioneer Aviator Eugene Ely
(36” X 24” Oil)

This painting depicts pioneering aviator, Eugene Ely, credited with making the first shipboard takeoff and landing.

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Norm Siegel
Louis Blériot Lors du Premiere Salon de L’Aeronatique à Paris, 1909
(36” X 36” Oil)

The first Paris Air Show opened on October 7, 1909, just 11 weeks after Loius Blériot’s record-breaking solo flight across the English Channel. The “Salon de l’Aeronautique” was an indoor affair held at the magnificent Grand Palais, originally built for the 1900 World’s Fair. A 775,000-sq.-ft. interior was capped by a 162,000-sq.-ft. steel and glass roof and dome. Over 100,000 visitors came to admire the early examples of “airborne mechanical locomotion” and to buy them. There were balloons, dirigibles, biplanes, monoplanes, automobiles, and boats, all spanning the past and present with a peek into the future. Nearly all engine, propeller, tire and canvas suppliers were there, some of which survive today (note the early Michelin man “Bib”). Electricity was new and the exhibit was lit at night by hundreds of globes hanging from the steelwork.
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Craig Slaff
Regards from Pearl
(20” X 24” Oil)

After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the situation in the Pacific was critical for Admiral Chester Nimitz and the U.S. Navy. Not wanting to cower and hide, Nimitz decided on hit-and-run tactics to bring the fight to the Japanese. This brilliant decision gave the U.S. Navy much needed practice for the job ahead of them: making war on Japan. The first strike was at Kwajalein Atoll on February 1, 1942. The USS Enterprise (CV-6) sent thirty-seven SBDs and nine TBDs to strike. They incorrectly identified Japanese cargo ships as two carriers and radioed back for a second wave to attack the shipping. This painting depicts the second wave led by LCDR Lance E Massey of VT-6 in the United States’ first torpedo strike of the war.

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Russell Smith
Two Birds with One Stone
(27” X 44” Oil)

This painting depicts an engagement on September 6, 1918, in which Captain H.P. Lale and 2/Lt H.L. Edwards of 20 Sq RAF achieved simultaneous victories against Fokker DVIIs while flying Bristol F2b E2181.

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Mimi Stuart
Aviation Pioneer Eugene Ely
(24” X 24” Mixed media on canvas with 24k gold, silver & copper leaf)

Eugene Burton Ely became the first pilot to take off from a Naval ship the moment his Curtiss pusher left the bow of the USS Birmingham in Virginia on November 14, 1910. As soon as the aeroplane cleared the specially constructed 83-foot platform runway, it dipped its wheels into the ocean, spraying Ely’s goggles with saltwater before rising up and then landing on the beach. Two months later, Ely performed the first successful shipboard landing, touching down aboard the USS Pennsylvania in San Francisco Bay.

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Mimi Stuart
Angel Dance
(24” X 24” Mixed media on canvas with 24k gold, silver & copper leaf)

The year 2011 marks the 65th anniversary of the oldest formal flying aerobatic team. Since 1946, the U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels have performed their aerial ballet to the delight and awe of over 420 million spectators worldwide. The painting depicts a solo FA-18 Hornet as it maneuvers just under the speed of sound. “...You are a symbol of the Navy and Marine Corps’ finest. You bring pride, hope and a promise for tomorrow’s Navy and Marine Corps in the smiles and handshakes of today’s youth.” (from the Blue Angels Creed, written by JO1 Cathy Konn)
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Charles Richard Taylor
Reflection
(9.5” X 13.5” Acrylic)

The subject matter of my painting is the North American P-51 Mustang of the 325th Fighter Group, 15th USAAF. The composition and imagery are from a series of photographs I took while working an air show in Tarkio, Missouri. Despite being an overcast and gloomy day, I was able to get a good reflection off the aluminum to create a nice effect.

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Charles Thompson
Buddies
(19.7” X 37.6” Oil)

This painting depicts an imagined encounter during the latter stages of the World War II in the Pacific, where the pilots of two Chance Vought F4U Corsairs greet each other while flying over the carrier USS Essex. One of the Corsairs is an F4U-1D of VFB-83, U.S. Navy, while the other is a Corsair IV of 1841 Sqdn. Fleet Air Arm, Royal Navy, from the British carrier HMS Formidable.

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Charles Thompson
The Graceful Princess
(19.7” X 37.6” Oil)

Three prototypes of a gigantic flying boat intended for commercial service were constructed in Britain between 1943 and 1953. The Saunders Roe Princess was almost as large as the Hughes H.2 Hercules (Spruce Goose) with a 215-foot wingspan and a 330,000-lb takeoff weight. It had the largest pressurized hull ever built, fly-by-wire controls and was designed to carry a 40,000-lb payload at a cruising speed of 360 mph. Power plants were ten 3,780-hp Proteus prop-turbine engines, eight of them coupled in pairs and driving contra-rotating propellers. Only one flew – G-ALUN – before the programme was scrapped.
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Charles Thompson
Somewhere in England
(15.8” X 23.6” Oil)

It is a warm summer morning in 1940 and a Supermarine Spitfire Mk VB of No.19 Sqdn. sits in the corner of an RAF airfield ‘Somewhere in England’ with the cockpit door open, the pilot’s parachute harness resting on the wing and the trolley starter motor connected, just waiting to be scrambled into deadly combat. Mist is rising from a nearby stream and a kingfisher successfully catches his breakfast, completely ignoring the No Fishing sign. The peaceful countryside on the one hand completely belies the imminent presence of war on the other.
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James Waldon
Clouds are Waiting
(16” X 20” Watercolor)

A gleaming Stearman awaits pilot John Mohr for a summer air show performance at Patrick Air Force Base, Florida.


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Pete Wenman
By the Dawn's Early Light
(24” X 36” Oil)

This painting depicts F-4B Phantoms from VF-151 on an early morning mission over North Vietnam, August 1972. NF 213 is piloted by John Chesire, with RIO George Healey; Ted Triebel pilots NF 210 with RIO Dave Everett. Dave and Ted were shot down on August 27, 1972, on a photo escort mission over North Vietnam; they spent the rest of the war as POWs in the infamous Hanoi Hilton. Everett recalls, “Aside from the very occasional MiGCAP, the best hops [flights] a JO could draw were the armed recces [reconnaissance missions] in Route Pack 5/6 at first light -- targets of opportunity as mostly we defined them, hoping to catch those night trucks trying to squeeze in a few extra kilometers before parking under the trees for the day. (Don’t think that scenario didn’t occur to Ted and I when we were being trucked to Hanoi). RIP to NF210 in a zillion pieces on a karst ridge in Thanh Hoa Province, lost on one of those low-altitude, go-fast, flak-magnet, Baby Giant photo escort missions that we all came to enjoy, on 7 August over Phu Ly Bridge, when all hell broke loose and luck petered out.”
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Pete Wenman
OK 2
(9” X 18” Oil)

Bart Bartholomay and Oran Brown catch the two-wire in Rock River 110 after an eventful MiGCAP mission over North Vietnam 18th May 1972.
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Andrew Whyte
Bombing Five on the Way to Coral Sea
(24” X 28” Oil)

The Battle of the Coral Sea took place from May 1-7, 1942. It was the first naval battle in history in which neither fleet saw the other; all the offensive action was between carrier air forces. On May 7 SBD Dauntless dive-bombers from the carrier USS Lexington found and crippled the Japanese light carrier Shoho. Further attacks by SBDs and TBD Devastator torpedo bombers sank the ship.
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