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2010 ASAA
International Aerospace Art Exhibition
The San Diego Air & Space Museum
San Diego, California

All art in the Exhibit is displayed on this page.
To see the award winning art, click here

Richard Allison, ASAA
Double Trouble
(17” X 20” Oil)

Two A-10 jets in formation, frontal view

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Steve Anderson, ASAA
Ltn. Fritz Hammer
(23” X 36” Oil)

On 23 September 1916, Ltn. dRMI Fritz Hammer, flying Marine No. 748, the first Hansa-Brandenburg KDW prototype, attacked a Sikorsky Ilya Mouromets reconnaissance-bomber and downed it after four firing passes.  This was the first air-to-air victory for a KDW and the second of only three Ilya Mouromets confirmed downed by German airplanes. This painting was cover art for the Autumn 2009 issue of Over the Front and was also published as cover art for the Winter edition of Aero Brush.

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Steve Anderson, ASAA
On the Way to China
(32” X 44” Oil)

Colonel Bill Bower, now 94, is one of the last surviving pilots of the 1942 Doolittle raid on Japan. The B-25 serial # 40-2278 was named "Fickle Finger" and was the twelfth plane of sixteen in the staggered row packed on the deck of USS Hornet. Names weren’t painted on most of the planes due to the nature of the mission. According to Bower's mission report, after hitting their targets at Yokohama, they strafed with .30 and .50 cal incendiary rounds, a Japanese weather boat and left it burning and sinking.

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Brian Bateman
To Fight Another Day
(30” X 46” Oil)

The subject is a B-29 Super fortress that has ditched in the Pacific in December 1944. The 11 man crew of “V Squared 60” reached safety in their rafts before the giant bomber sank into the sea. The crew was fighting not only to survive the ditching but the vast ocean and the fast approaching dusk. Ships, submarines, and search planes (Catalinas, Dumbos) were placed along the routes of the bombers in order to give the crews at least a 50/50 chance of survival. Via radio and some lady luck, this crew has made contact with one of those PBYs along the route. They were lucky to survive the ditching in a rough sea and lucky to fight another day.

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Ardell Bourgeouis
Avanti
(15” X 18” Gouache)

The Piaggio P180 Avanti is a fast, fuel efficient and stylish business and light commuter aircraft. The pusher turboprop configuration, canards and lifting body fuselage give the aircraft a maximum speed of 455 mph with an econ-cruise of 368 mph. She began life in 1980, followed by a three-year collaboration with Learjet that ended in 1986. Learjet's influence is evidenced by the ventral fins below the tail section. After a prolonged period of financial insecurity, a group of investors lead by Piero Ferrari became involved and roughly 100 have been sold. The follow-on Avanti II is now in production.

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Ardell Bourgeouis
Dove of War
(31” X 25” Oil)

A Rumpler Taube (Dove) cruises in the burgeoning light of dawn over the stalled Western Front in 1914. The docile and stable Taube is well suited to artillery observation but its time in combat is short lived, being pulled from front line service within six months of the start of hostilities. It could not maneuver with the bi-planes and was “easy meat” for Allied pilots. First flown in 1910, designer Igo Etrich's patent application was ruled invalid and the design became public domain in Germany. Anybody could produce Taubes, making it the most numerous aircraft in the German arsenal in 1914.

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Mark Bray
The Magic of Flight
(28” X 22” Watercolor)

The fascination with flight has been around as long as mankind is old. As adults, we can understand how birds fly, how airplanes get off the ground and how the Space Shuttle leaves the grip of Earth and heads into space. “The Magic of Flight” is all about that inherent need to look into the sky and wonder at anything and everything that moves within it, just as a child does.

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Ross Buckland
Canadian Classics
(34” X 46” Oil)

Depicted are two of Canada\'s proudest transportation achievements, the Noorduyn Norseman and Canadian Pacific's Selkirks. The Selkirks, constructed in Montreal from 1929 until 1949, were the largest steam locomotives in the Commonwealth. Thirty-six were built to haul the freight and passenger trains through the Rockies between Calgary and Revelstoke. On a daily basis, they crossed the Selkirk Range after which they were named.

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Merana Cadorette
Around at the 1910 Air Meet
(8” X 14” Ceramic)

My introduction to aviation came from attending air shows and fly-ins.  In researching early aviation events, I chanced upon information about the 1910 Los Angeles International Air Meet at Dominguez Field.  Using photographs for reference to the actual airships and airplanes that were there, but using colors inspired by a poster of the event; the pot is a circular panorama of the meet - a tribute to the early days of introducing flight to the general public.

Some of the craft are in low relief, others simply painted on.

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Hank Caruso, ASAA
Encapsulated
(16” X 20” Ink & Prismacolor)

We're used to seeing astronauts cavorting through the relatively large living spaces aboard the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station.  But, in the early days of the US space program, Project Mercury astronauts had no such luxury.  The Mercury space capsule was too cramped to allow an astronaut to leave his seat or perform extravehicular activities (EVAs).  Ground crews needed to carefully shoehorn Mercury astronauts into their confined "cockpits" without damaging their life-sustaining space suits.

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Hank Caruso, ASAA
Slot Hop
(16” X 20” Ink & Prismacolor)

It’s not that the other positions in the Blue Angels diamond require any less piloting magic, but it’s amazing how far the nose of the number 4, or "slot," F/A-18 Hornet is tucked into the middle of all of that other hurtling metal.  This Aerocature™ shows the Blue Angels famous Diamond Dirty Loop, flown in full afterburner. I tried to convey the intense concentration that the slot pilot must exercise to make the maneuver look deceptively easy from the ground.

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Hank Caruso, ASAA
Trapping the Phantom
(16” X 20” Ink & Prismacolor)

Arrested landings on carriers, or "traps," are truly structurally challenging events for tailhook aircraft.  From speeds near 200 mph and heights over 20 feet, the massive F-4 Phantom was brought to a complete stop within only a few hundred feet.  This Aerocature™ emphasizes the enormous inertial and impact forces at work in every carrier landing event.

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Douglas Castleman
North American F-100D
(12” X 28” Oil)

North American F-100D Super Sabre of the 353rd TFS, 354th TFW, Myrtle Beach AFB, South Carolina, 1959.

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John Clark, ASAA
Mariner 10 Above Venus
(30” X 40” Oil)

Mariner 10 was launched on November 2, 1973 atop the Atlas/Centaur rocket from Launch Complex 36B.  The spacecraft was placed in a parking orbit after launch for approximately 25 minutes, and then placed in orbit around the Sun en route to Venus.  The orbit direction was opposite to the motion of the Earth around the Sun. The spacecraft passed Venus on February 5, 1974 at a distance of 4200 km and took some 4,000 photos of Venus. They revealed a nearly round planet enveloped in smooth cloud layers.

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John Clark, ASAA
The Occultation of Saturn
(12” X 16” Oil)

The planet Saturn begins its passage behind one of its moons.

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John Clark, ASAA
United Airlines Boeing 727
(19” X 41” Oil)

United Airlines Boeing 727 commercial aircraft.

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David Darbyshire
Pancho Barnes' Travel Air R613K
(20” X 28” Watercolor)

Pancho Barnes received her Travel Air Mystery Ship R613K at Grand Central, Glendale June 27, 1930.

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David Darbyshire
Wedell Williams #44
(16” X 24” Watercolor)

Wedell Williams #44 at Lockheed, Burbank, getting ready for the 1933 Air Races at Los Angeles Municipal Airport.

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William A. Dodge
Home Again, Home Again, Jiggity Jig
(46” X 36” Oil)

Spitfire Mark IIs of the No. 501 Squadron join up over the English countryside and return home after an encounter in June 1941.

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Keith Ferris, ASAA
Boeing 727 Enters Service
(24” X 30” Oil)

Boeing 727 Enters Service

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Keith Ferris, ASAA
John Glenn and Friendship 7
(24” X 30” Oil)

John Glenn and Friendship 7

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Steve Heyen
Action over the Estuary
(25” X 32” Oil)

Spitfire Mark 1 flown by Flight Officer B. Carbury, No 603 Squadron, in action over the Thames Estuary in August 1940.

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Steve Heyen
The Nine-O-Nine
(29” X 45” Oil)

B-17 G-30-BO of the 333rd Bomb Squadron, 91st Bomb Group, encounters home defense Me109s over Germany in 1944.

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Kristin Hill, ASAA
The Chariot of Nyx
(20” X 36” Oil)

The SR-71 races through the skies at Mach 3.5 and 80,000 feet or higher. Revered ancient Greek goddess of night, Nyx rides her swift chariot into the night skies. Marta Bohn-Meyer was the only female to crew in the SR-71. As a flight engineer for NASA, she flew backseat in NASA’s SR-71 aircraft and participated in many research projects.

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Samuel Hoffman
Blacksnakes
(16” X 28” Oil)

The Blacksnakes of the 122nd TFW of Indiana Air National Guard soar over the Wabash River in northern Indiana.

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Virginia Ivanicki
The Architects of Heaven: Altitude
(51” X 27” Oil)

The oil painting “Altitude” is of a P-51A flying over a tilting groundscape of countryside typical of some WWII warzones. The angle of the ground fractures off into a timeless abyss. Above is the instrument panel from a 1940’s Harvard wartime training plane, known as the T-6 in the USAAF. Many Canadian pilots flew both planes in the war, notably the RCAF’s 417 Fighter Squadron. All elements are without time or gravitational limits; as limitless as the memory of their sacrifice.

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Mark Jannakos
Rockets
(54” X 32” Oil)

Rockets

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Mark Jannakos
Ultimate Tag Team
(54” X 32” Oil)

Hers and His F-16's: The pilots of these jets, Jamie and Cameron Nordin, are married to each other. 

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Tom Kalina
Lady Grace
(28” X 24” Oil)

“Lady Grace” is a late model P-47D assigned to the 368th Fighter Group, 395th Fighter Squadron known as the “Panzer Dusters”.  Flown by Lt. Lawrence Marsch and named after his girl friend, Grace, in this scene he is returning to his base in France, taking a moment to reflect on his good fate after another mission completed safely.

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Tom Kalina
Mainliner Chicago
(28” X 40” Oil)

A United Airlines Douglas DC-6B "Mainliner Chicago" arrives in the evening at Chicago's Midway Airport in the mid-fifties.

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Joe Kline
God's Own Lunatics
(24” X 26” Oil)

The title was endearingly bestowed upon Vietnam War helicopter crews by war correspondent and  journalist Joe Galloway. The UH-1 Huey “Slick” was by far the most widely used helicopter of the war and over 2,500 were lost during that conflict.  In this scene, a Huey “Slick” lands amidst withering fire to pick up a LRRP (Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol). One tenth of all soldier lost during the Viet Nam War were helicopter crewmen.

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Joe Kline
Good Vibrations
(24” X 36” Oil)

The area of Northern I Corps in South Vietnam was mostly mountainous with very few roads.  During the Vietnam War, the U.S. Army established artillery fire bases with overlapping fields of fire and hilltop landing zones were established to insert and re-supply ground troops.  In this scene, repeated thousands of times during the war, a UH-1 Huey “Slick” pulls away from a hilltop LZ as others approach to land. 

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Bruce MacKay
Dambusters, Third Wave
(23” X 27” Oil)

Operation Chastise - the Dambusters Raid - as it became known, was undertaken by 19 Avro Lancasters of 617 Squadron on the night of May 16th 1943.It was the most audacious bombing raid of the Second World War. For the loss of 11 aircraft, the Mohne and Eder dams, in Germany's industrial heartland, were breached by Barnes Wallis' "bouncing bombs" and a famous, if controversial, victory won.

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Bruce Mackay
Eagles Swap Kites
(19” X 43” Oil)

In 1942, the RAF Eagle Squadrons were transferred to the USAAF.  Leroy Gover continued flying the Spitfire until January 1943 because of the paucity of new P-47 Thunderbolts.  He made a quick transition to the P-47, flying solo on his first flight, with little ground school or other preparation.  Gover obviously enjoyed flying the much larger and more sophisticated Thunderbolt.  In January 1944, he returned home for a 30-day leave and was reassigned as a flight instructor in the United States. In this painting, Gover's Spitfire buzzes his newly arrived P47 as it is 'fed and watered' at dispersal.

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Larry Manofsky
One-Hundred Sixty-Million Horsepower
(52” X 40” Acrylic)

The first stage of the Saturn V rocket was powered by five F-1 engines manufactured by Rocketdyne of Canoga Park, CA. This type of engine was first test fired in March 1959 and is still the largest single-chamber rocket engine ever built.  Each engine consumed 680 gallons of kerosene and liquid oxygen per second and produced 1.5 million pounds of thrust.  The five engines of the Saturn V were capable of accelerating the 7.5 million pound, 363-foot tall moon rocket to a speed of 6,200 miles per hour, 9 times faster than a speeding bullet.

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Mark Milkowski
Open Doors
(28” X 20” Silkscreen Print)

Painting the sublime arena in which the B-17s flew plucks a strange and primitive chord within me. It keens my senses to parts of the world I am bound to, but do not understand. If these are history paintings, then they are revisited out of context, in a dream world with no chronology, a place where inspiration comes less from people’s stories and more from chord-striking junk like a swimming blue whale, or a silent white space pod from 2001: A Space Odyssey.

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Pati O'Neal
AA Flagship Detroit
(22” X 28” Oil)

This painting of American Airlines Flagship Detroit DC-3, in all of its chrome glory as it sits on the tarmac, was done monochromatically to capture the essence of a bygone era.

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Pati O'Neal
Rise and Shine Cubs
(24” X 30” Oil)

This painting captures the beginning of a brand new day for these Piper J3 Cubs as the hangar door opens to let the rays of the rising sun in.

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Pati O'Neal
Staggerwing Reflections
(24” X 30” Oil)

This painting captures the reflections in the immaculate finish of a classic 1944 Beechcraft Model D17S Staggerwing set off by the setting sun.

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Cher Pruys
A Canadian Moment
(17” X 21” Watercolor)

This trusty Cessna 185 aircraft portrayed at the dock in the mist is truly a Northern Canadian scene.

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Cher Pruys
Nightfall
(12” X 18” Acrylic/Watercolor)

This vintage workhorse, a Beech 18, is portrayed dockside at the end of a busy day. This is a common scene in the North country as night falls.

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Cher Pruys
Scenic Flight
(17” X 23” Acrylic/Watercolor)

The passengers and crew of this helicopter are in for a scenic flight, as they make their way across the northern skies.

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Sharon Rajnus
Bird-Dog Office
(18” X 24” Pencil)

This scene captures the Vietnam pilot at work. The airplane is a Cessna L-19, superb in its ability to turn over-a-point and spot enemy positions. The year is 1969, and the location is Vietnam.

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Sharon Rajnus
Night Ascent
(36” X 30” Watercolor)

Hot-air ballooning is gaining in popularity. Balloons are massive and, to obtain lift, the aerostat must displace several tons of air. Balloon launch is always interesting, and spectacular at night! The propane burner gives audio and visual verification of the launch, and a double system can be seen here.

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Sharon Ranus
Ultimate Recycle
(46” X 36” Oil)

In the West, fighting fires is real, frequent, and deadly. Recycled aircraft, military and commercial, are regularly refitted with tanks to handle retardant making them the ultimate recycled airplanes. Here you see a PB-4Y Privateer dumping over a fast-moving front.

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David Rawlins
N44V
(30” X 49” Acrylic/Oil)

Piedmont Airlines was based in Winston-Salem NC and flew their first scheduled flight in February 1948 using a DC-3. Piedmont operated 22 DC-3s, retiring the last of them in 1963.

In 1986, Piedmont purchased a former C-47, built in 1942, which had been converted to DC-3 configuration after the war and used as an executive transport.  Piedmont had it painted in the old Piedmont colors and re-registered as N44V and used it for promotional purposes. Piedmont Airlines was absorbed into US Air in 1989.
N44V is currently owned and operated by the Carolinas Aviation Museum based at the Charlotte-Douglas airport in Charlotte NC.

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Steve Remington
Shared Airspace— Oyster Bay — 1934 Bellanca Airbus P-200A
(24” X 36” Alkyd)

Arguably the most efficient airplane design ever built, the Bellanca “Airbus” P-200A floatplane NC-785W was used as an aerial commuter from the wealthy enclaves of Long Island to Wall Street’s East River float, commencing July 16, 1934 as New York-Suburban Air Lines.  Airline use ceased that year as regulations prohibited single engine transports.  Only four of the civilian Airbus examples were built and about 14 more were delivered to the A.C.C. as the C-27-A to -C.  The later “Aircruiser” model, with more muscle, was extensively used in Canada as a bush airplane.

The White Pelican can be found in eastern bays and estuaries during the summer month’s breeding season.

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Paul Rendel, ASAA
Clear Guns
(29” X 41” Oil)

A new day and one more long mission with B-17's settling into the formation. The Ball turret gunner is ready for the order to be given: "Clear Guns."
Program for American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA).

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Michelle Rouche
GBU-12 Loaded onto Bombcat
(37” X 38” Watercolor)

As a lead engineer assigned to the Paveway Program, I was inspired to paint a rendition of the GBU-12 Paveway II bomb series. This rendition showed Aviation Ordnancemen lifting the 500 pound GBU-12 Laser Guided Bomb onto an F-14B Tomcat aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, USS Harry S. Truman.

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Douglas Rowe
Another Mission Tomorrow
(20” X 24” Oil)

The day started very early, hours before sunrise, and it included another grueling round trip flight deep into Germany. The wounds from the shells and shrapnel have already been patched as the sun is setting over the English countryside. Rest will be brief, the Group has been alerted and there is "Another Mission Tomorrow."

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Stu Shepard
F-4E MiG Killers
(23” X 31” Acrylic)

This image depicts a U.S. Air Force F-4E Phantom II downing a North Vietnamese MiG-21. Piloted by Capt. Dick Coe and RIO Lt. Ken Webb, this 34th TFS, 388 TFW Phantom shot down a MiG over North Vietnam on 5 October 1972. Using one of the then unreliable Sparrow missiles to force the MiG into a closer engagement, Dick Coe's shot managed to hit the MiG while the Phantom pulled heavy Gs to avoid another brace of MiGs. They made it home, but were unsure of the kill until it was confirmed the following day.

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Stu Shepard
Tora, Tora, Tora
(22” X 28” Acrylic & Oil)

The December 7, 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor is just beginning as Nakajima B5N2 Type 97 "Kate"- nominally a  torpedo bomber but here used as level bomber - is shown approaching Ford Island in company with more Kates and Val dive bombers. The red-tailed aircraft is that of the attack leader, Commander Fuchida, moments before he had radioed the infamous attack call "Tora Tora Tora" meaning that complete surprise had been achieved. The image was created for the Bert Kinzey book "Attack on Pearl Harbor - Japan Awakes A Sleeping Giant."

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Craig Slaff, ASAA
Alpha Strike Haiphong
(28” X 34” Oil)

In mid-April of 1967, the winter monsoon finally released its IFR hold on North Vietnam.  The Lyndon Johnson administration decided to push the North to the peace talks by lifting the restrictions and allowing bombing of industrial targets around Hanoi and Haiphong. The painting “Alpha Strike Haiphong” depicts the second wave of the day, led by Marvin Quaid, as he and VA -212 are about to go "feet dry" over Cat_Ba_Beach, Haiphong.

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Eldon Slick
Spirit of Domination
(22” Sculpture)

Spirit of Domination - B2 will find you.

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Russell Smith, ASAA
By the Dawns Early Light
(24” X46” Oil)

Three Nieuport 17s of the Lafayette Escadrille, piloted by Lts. Lufebery, Thaw and Hill, fly a morning patrol over the Western Front in 1916.

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Russell Smith, ASAA
Yellow Jackets
(25 1/2” X 28” Oil)

“Yellow Jackets” features Fokker Triplanes of Jasta 27.  The unit’s markings included yellow cowlings, wheel covers, struts and rear fuselages.  The lead aircraft belongs to Ltn. Rudolf Klimke, whose personal marking was a large anchor.  The pilot and serial number of the second bird are unknown, but period photos clearly show the marking of this aircraft – a large “V” with small yellow stars.  The triplane with the white markings in the bottom left corner is Obltn. Hermann Goering, the Staffel commander at the time. The airfield is based on Bulluin-Ost, Jasta 27’s home in the spring of 1918.

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Russell Smith, ASAA
Starting Line
(26” X 56” Oil)

“Starting Line” features Eddie Rickenbacker and his famous SPAD XIII, S’4523, at the airfield of Saints, France, circa August 1918.  Most depictions of S’4523 show it in its late configuration – shortened exhaust stacks, red/white/blue (back to front) rudder, and patched bullet holes.  However, in August 1918, when the 94th Aero Squadron was based at Saints, S’4523 carried the standard length exhaust, no bullet patches and the original blue/white/red French rudder.  The title is a dual reference to the action on the flight line and Rickenbacker’s pre-war career as a race car driver.

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Marcus Stewart, ASAA
Gotcha!
(13” X 19” Oil)

Late May, 1944:  An F-5E-2 Lightning of the 34th Photo Recon Squadron streaks down the beaches of Normandy, photographing German shore installations prior to the Allied invasion of Europe.

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Mimi Stuart
Dare to Fly
(36” X 60” Mixed Media)

Honoring Jonathan Strickland, who at the age of 14 became America’s youngest pilot setting three aeronautical world records.  On Thursday, June 29th 2006, he became the youngest person to solo both a helicopter and airplane on the same day; the youngest African-American to solo a helicopter; and the youngest African-American to fly a helicopter roundtrip internationally.   Jonathan serves as a shining example inspiring young people to follow their dreams and dare to fly.

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Gretchen Taylor
Uh-Oh
(47” X 41” Oil)

Sleek in design and all business, one would not want to be on the receiving end of this A129 Augusta Mangusta.

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Charles Thompson, ASAA, GAvA
I Pressed the Fire Control and Rockets Blazed
(25” X 21” Oil)

Hawker Typhoon B1, Serial No. MN526, Codes TP.V, of No. 198 Squadron RAF, firing an eight rocket broadside at Panzer armoured vehicles hiding in a wood near Plumetot, France, during the Allied breakout from the Normandy beach heads, July 1944.

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Charles Thompson, ASAA, GAvA
The Bateleur Eagleu
(24” X 21” Oil)

Cessna-Rheims F337 LYNX of 4 Squadron, the Rhodesian Air Force.

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Stan Vosburg
Oscar, Tony, Jandia Three
(26” X 38” Oil)

Captain Jay Robbins, pulls his P-38,"Jandina III", into a tight left turn while firing his 20mm cannon at a fleeing Japanese Nakajima Ki.43, "Oscar". A flaming Kawasaki K.61, "Tony", marks Robbins' first victory of the day over the coast of New Guinea in the late winter of 1944.

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Stan Vosburg
Twin Tails and Carrot Tops
(30” X 42” Oil)

Two "Rosy Riveters" from the ball turret factory in Anaheim, California, have traveled to Corona del Mar for a brief respite from their grueling work schedule and to let their children play in the shallows at low tide.  Military airplanes flying overhead were a common sight, but it was always exciting to see the P-38s of the Home Defense group up close and low.  The finishing touch to a sand castle is a worthy work of art, but for one of the redheaded twins the approach and roar of two supercharged Allison engines is enough to send him leaping in ecstasy.

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Jerry Ward
Sortie Break
(28” X 8” Wood Sculpture)

American Cherry was used for this subject because I feel it is the noblest of the many varieties of wood and issues a resemblance to bronze in the finished piece.  Cherry has in its nature to deepen in color over the years, acquiring an ever richer, more even tone.  Much research was made to devise the apparel worn by this pilot, and is actually a compilation of many old photos, borrowing pieces here and there and then improvising.  I wanted the figure to look relaxed but with a hint of apprehension.

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Pete Wenman
Devil Dog Takedown
(24” X 42 ” Oil)

Flying from the deck of the USS America, Shamrock 201, a Phantom F-4J from VMFA-333, scores the only aerial kill by a USMC aircraft during the Vietnam war on a VPAF MiG21 on the 11th September 1972. While departing the area, the Phantom itself was shot down by a SAM, although both the crew, Major Lee Lasseter and Captain John Cummings, were successfully recovered by Search and Rescue forces.

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